Tax-Advantaged Life Insurance with Access to Market Returns – Rob Hagg

Indexed and Variable Universal Life Insurance Could Be a Play for Tax Conscience Investors

For moderate to aggressive savers who are tax conscience about their investments and appreciate long-term horizons, cash-value life insurance offers domestic and foreign indices as well as equity and bond subaccounts. Wealthy and affluent investors appreciate the tax-free income that can help manage taxes in retirement and in an allocated investment portfolio.

Cash-value life insurance, issued as a non-modified endowment contract, can generate tax-free distributions as long as the contract is kept in force for the life of the policy insured. So that’s the caveat for the taxation issue. Having a menu of investment possibilities suitable for the policy owner can help build a portfolio according to their risk tolerance and financial goals. Watch the interview with popular platform speaker; asset management and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg as he speaks about indexing and subaccount investing with tax-advantaged life insurance.

Indexed Universal Life provides limited access to domestic and foreign, i.e., no dividends and may have rates of return caps or participation rates. But the trade off is the crediting account will never credit a negative return, so zero is your worst scenario, with downside market protection. On the other side of the balance sheet, you have policy expenses like most financial products. So you could have a zero crediting year minus your policy expenses and experience an actual loss. That’s full disclosure.

Variable Universal Life provides access to equity and bond subaccounts that charge a management fee and traditional life insurance policy expense loads. The extra fees have to be assessed against the tax savings to determine if the arbitrage between them has economic value. For high-tax-bracket investors, the tax savings overcome the extra expense. But keep in mind outside these subaccounts you’re subject to market volatility, so you can lose money.

Both of these product lines are long-term horizon investments. In fact, to remain tax-free, the contract must be kept in force for the life of the policy insured, i.e., a lifetime horizon.

Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts are comprised of two types of tax-free distributions: one is tax-free basis; the other is a tax-free collateralized policy loan. To ensure tax-free distributions, Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts must be kept in force for the life of the policy insured.

Nationally syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews with popular platform speaker, asset management expert and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg. Right on the Money is a weekly one-hour online broadcast for TV and radio distribution. The show contains five ten-minute segments that are redistributed online as individual video press releases.

Tax-Conscience Savers Should Consider Life Insurance – Rob Hagg

Par Whole Life and Universal Life Insurance Interest Crediting Contracts

If you’re a tax-conscience, conservative, long-term saver, you should consider two cash-value life insurance contracts that are interest-rate driven via the insurance-companies-dominated portfolio of investment grade government bonds. One is the vanguard of cash-value policies entitled Participating Whole Life and the other is Current Interest Rate Universal Life. Both have their pros and cons as a savings vehicle, but the tax advantages of both can present a real appeal to consumers.

Undergoing a risk-tolerance test can help you build a financial profile that can serve you in the decision-making process. If the results of your test determine you’re a conservative saver or investor, make sure your 401(k) or IRA reflects your psychonomic characteristic of a conservative. Often a risk-tolerance test will result in a conservative profile, while your retirement plan has beta risk exposure unsuitable for you. Watch the interview with popular platform speaker, asset management and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg as he talks about the tax-conscience, conservative saver and why they should consider par whole life or universal life insurance.

Just as there are thousands of mutual funds and ETFs, there are thousands of cash-value life insurance policies. All financial products have current expense loads and differing historical performance. In there, the product inventory of participating whole life and current interest rate universal life, the consumer contenders are limited to a dozen insurance companies. Here are the basics on why you may want to look into these products.

Participating Whole Life Insurance can be optimized to generate more than 5 percent with its base policy and no other riders. But a minimized base policy with a “paid-up additions rider” for excess contributions can generate 5.5 percent. Keep in mind the best in this category could be returning dividends (a combination of portfolio returns and unused premiums) north of those numbers. Dividends are not guaranteed, but the top par whole contracts have guarantees cash values backed by company reserves. The draw back is these contracts are not as flexible as their universal life counterparts, making them a bit restrictive. But if you like the returns and guarantees that go with it, participating whole life could be you.

Current Interest Rate Universal Life Insurance is flexible, but with the protracted low-interest-rate environment, it has fallen out of favor. At its conception it was crediting double-digit returns. Today, the guarantees have been lowered and the current crediting interest rates are low when compared to participating whole life. But if rising interest rates returned again, it could once again become a popular choice for conservative savers. But the big news here is many Americans have these policies with 4-percent guaranteed interest rates. You should order an in-force ledger to determine if over funding these contract makes sense for you.

Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts are comprised of two types of tax-free distributions: one is tax-free basis; the other is a tax-free collateralized policy loan. To ensure tax-free distributions, Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts must be kept in force for the life of the policy insured.

Nationally syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews with popular platform speaker, asset management expert and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg. Right on the Money is a weekly one-hour online broadcast for TV and radio distribution. The show contains five ten-minute segments that are redistributed online as individual video press releases.

Creating Insurance Policy That Can Deliver Optimal Returns – Rob Hagg

Designing an Optimal Life Insurance Policy for Tax-Deferred Cash Accumulation and Tax-Free Distributions

Designing an efficient cash-centric life insurance policy is an engineering marvel for those mortality mechanics who understand the blue prints of insurance regulation and the tax code—not just any insurance professional will do. It must be designed by a professional who understands all the moving parts of the policy and the rules that govern these types of contracts. If designed correctly, it is almost undefeatable. If designed incorrectly, it’s always indefensible.

A non-modified endowment, cash-value life insurance contract kept in force for the life of the policy insured can generate tax-free distributions. That’s the disclosure. Here’s the caveat: most insurance professionals and financial advisors don’t possess the skill sets for optimal cash-centric design, nor the rule and regulations that govern these contracts. Watch the interview with popular platform speaker, asset management and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg as he addresses how creating a low-cost life insurance policy can deliver an optimal return.

There are hundreds of life insurance companies that offer differing crediting methods for their income-oriented policies, but in reality, there are a dozen contracts worth reviewing that are competitive in their featured product lines and have some consumer history a potential policy owner can appreciate.

All financial products have costs associated with them. Managing the cost of insurance in a permanent cash-value policy is the singular most important item in constructing an efficient contract. The goal is to determine who in the family has the lowest cost of insurance. In general terms, females have lower costs than their same-age male counterparts. The health underwriting also seems to favor females over males. So in most cases, female insureds are less expensive compared to males.

The next step is a little heady. You need to determine the contribution schedule. That’s easy. But then you need to calculate the lowest death benefit with the best death benefit option under the TAMAR provisions to maintain its non-modified endowment status. The third step is to discover which regulation is the most cost-effective: the guideline annual or the cash-value accumulation test. This is where you need a specialist. Many insurance professionals tout their knowledge in this area, but most “income” polices are not optimized and result in unnecessary costs.

Before you venture into the realm of tax-free income via cash-value life insurance or you desire a review of an existing contact, email [email protected]

Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts are comprised of two types of tax-free distributions: one is tax-free basis; the other is a tax-free collateralized policy loan. To ensure tax-free distributions, Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts must be kept in force for the life of the policy insured.

Nationally syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews with popular platform speaker, asset management expert and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg. Right on the Money is a weekly one-hour online broadcast for TV and radio distribution. The show contains five ten-minute segments that are redistributed online as individual video press releases.

Funding College Education, Retirement and Generational Income – Rob Hagg

Life Insurance Can Be Used in a Variety of Income-Planning Scenarios

Most consumers are unaware cash-value life insurance has several planning scenarios and tax strategies that can reposition existing assets and redirect monthly contributions from savings accounts to this unique tax-advantaged product. There are saving and investment options to choose from based on your risk tolerance, liquidity needs and financial goals.

Life insurance is a mortality product based on the health of the policy insured. The better the health of the non-smoking policy insured, the cheaper the cost of insurance and the potential to generate tax-free income. Once you and your insurance professional determine the underwriting classification results are economical, you need to turn your attention to undergoing a risk-tolerance test to assess your crediting methodology.

Life insurance crediting options can be interest rates, indices or sub-account driven. After determining the crediting method, your insurance professional can design the lowest death benefit amount to comply with the TAMRA regulations to create an efficient, non-modified endowment contract. Watch the interview with popular platform speaker, asset management and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg as he discusses using tax-free income generated from a life insurance contract for college education, retirement and generational income as a legacy.

A non-modified endowment cash-value life insurance contract can be used as a cash reserve account that accumulates tax deferred and permits access to the policy’s collateralized tax-free loans. A new trend in college planning has emerged for parents with young children to contribute monies to their college funds. Traditional 529 plans can still be used, but some parents have elected to fund their child’s education exclusively with life insurance. In the end, as with all savings and investment products, owner suitability is a key component to the decision-making process.

Non-modified endowment cash-value life insurance contracts can also be used for supplemental, tax-free retirement income or as a stand-alone retirement plan. However, recently, these types of contracts have been used in multi-generational planning, not so much for the death benefit, but for tax-free income over generations of progeny. Consider a non-smoking healthy grandmother age 65 and her 5-year-old grandson, who utilize an indexed universal survivorship contract optimized for accumulation. The survivorship contract doesn’t pay until the second death, more than likely the grandson. But access to collateralized policy loans accumulating over the life expectancy of the grandson could be substantial. Under current tax law, try getting your mind around 100 years of tax-free income covering two to three generations.

Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts are comprised of two types of tax-free distributions: one is tax-free basis; the other is a tax-free collateralized policy loan. To ensure tax-free distributions, Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts must be kept in force for the life of the policy insured.

Nationally syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews with popular platform speaker, asset management expert and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg. Right on the Money is a weekly one-hour online broadcast for TV and radio distribution. The show contains five ten-minute segments that are redistributed online as individual video press releases.

Creating a Tax-Free Retirement Plan – Rob Hagg

Adding a Reverse Mortgage, Roth IRA and Life Insurance to Social Security Income

If you’re under age 50, not in a high-effective tax bracket and not receiving a matching contribution from your employer into your 401(k), consider dumping your ERISA plan in favor of a tax-free retirement. It’s probably too late for baby boomers in or near retirement, but it might just be the perfect time for the younger generation to break ranks with the conventional and think about a revolutionary retirement concept.

Most Americans planning for retirement are familiar with their Social Security benefits, Roth IRAs and reverse mortgages. But few understand the benefits of tax-free income from a non-modified endowment cash-value life insurance contract. The vast majority understands life insurance as an indemnification product to protect their family, business associates and favorite charities. But few have considered its tax-deferred accumulation advantage and tax-free distributions of return of basis and collateralized policy loans of gain. The affluent among us have used cash-value life insurance as a tax-favored vehicle for decades. Adding tax-free income from life insurance to these other tax-free products or strategies can deliver more net-spendable income during retirement. Watch the interview with popular platform speaker, asset management and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg as he talks about creating a tax-free retirement plan.

Social Security benefits may be taxable based on its own income inclusion in the provisional income test, but tax deductions, exemptions and tax credits may offset higher benefit income, resulting in tax-free benefits. The tax-free income from Roth IRAs, reverse mortgages and cash-value life insurance is not includable in the provisional income test. So under current law, it’s conceivable you could design a tax-free retirement that could yield more net-spendable income and allow you to keep more of your hard-earned retirement income.

If you’re under age 50, you may consider diverting your future 401(k) or IRA contributions to fund a Roth IRA (if you qualify). When you turn age 59½, you can begin converting any monies in your 401(k) and IRAs to Roth IRAs over a 10-year period ending at age 70. Delaying Social Security until age 70 will maximize your lifetime benefits. It’s exciting to consider this new approach that could become the new retirement plan for the next generation of retirees.

Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts are comprised of two types of tax-free distributions: one is tax-free basis; the other is a tax-free collateralized policy loan. To ensure tax-free distributions, Non-Modified Endowment Life Insurance Contracts must be kept in force for the life of the policy insured.

Nationally syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews with popular platform speaker, asset management expert and life insurance specialist Rob Hagg. Right on the Money is a weekly one-hour online broadcast for TV and radio distribution. The show contains five ten-minute segments that are redistributed online as individual video press releases.

Allowing Your Risk Tolerance to Dictate Your Investment Strategy – Rodger Sprouse

Investing Appropriately, According to Your Risk Tolerance May Let You Sleep Better

A mismatch between a retirement plan and its owner can cause disastrous results in the near and long term. Risk-averse investors do well to sacrifice some rewards to achieve peace of mind. Diversified asset allocations can meet the different needs of individuals and couples in retirement. Watch the interview with investment adviser representative Rodger Sprouse.

Like a poor-fitting garment purchased for all the wrong reasons, a retirement portfolio that does not suit its owner will only cause ongoing discomfort. The resulting anxiety can incite nervous short-term decisions – such as panic-driven selling in a down market cycle – and can cause ripple effects that can jeopardize a long-deserved retirement. Since retirement is not a time for “do-overs,” retirees are well-served by recognizing their financial disposition, and seeking help to design a forward-thinking plan that considers both distributions and taxes.

Coming to grips with one’s risk tolerance is demonstrated in Shakespeare’s Hamlet by Polonius, who said, “To thine own self be true.” As relates to retirement planning, it simply means implementing asset allocations that forgo risky, high-potential gains in the name of consistency and stability. The benefits of such a strategy include the peace of mind needed to live a desired lifestyle, and the ability to sleep well at night – sometimes named the S-W-A-N effect.

Wives more than husbands have been cited to accurately – and more conservatively – assess an acceptable level of risk in a household. This often leads to asset allocations that provide income and security by employing a “singles vs. home runs” approach, to use a baseball analogy.

An allocation that can meet clients’ suitability standard is a fixed index annuity. An insurance product, annuities can produce tax-free income, account growth and protection from loss – even in down-market cycles – within an appropriate structure. Not all gains are captured, and dividends are excluded, however, annuities can complement the typically large presence of tax-deferred accounts such as IRAs and 401(k)s. Besides being a good fit for the risk-averse, annuities are appropriate for investors short on time until retirement.

Tax management strategies in retirement are often overlooked, and their absence can be another source of pain since taxes are often retirement’s largest expense. Rather than taking many types of distributions and willingly accepting Uncle Sam’s tax bill, investors can exercise some control over taxes – or their timing – by staggering or delaying income distributions from Roth IRAs or other sources.

While retirees can’t control markets or interest rates, for example, they have some control over their assets’ structure. Importantly, retirees can match asset allocations to their financial temperament in pursuit of a stress and panic-free retirement.

Syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews Investment Adviser Representative Rodger Sprouse on Retirement Expectations. Right on the Money is a weekly financial talk show for consumers, distributed as video press releases to 280 media outlets and social media networks nationwide.

Mutual Fund Diversity May Need to Add Fees into the Equation – Rodger Sprouse

Investors Often Underestimate Mutual Funds’ Annual Fees by 50%

Regulations striving for full disclosure are bringing light to impactful fees often missing from prospectuses. The burden of knowledge is with the investor in order to overcome representatives’ miscommunications or obscure product literature. Watch the interview with investment adviser representative Rodger Sprouse.

Investors holding mutual funds in taxable accounts for the sake of diversity are often – and surprisingly – left holding the bag on unanticipated fees and taxable events that can compromise returns.

While many assume that total fees are roughly 1%, the total may be much higher when lesser-known fees are included. The “average” statement of addition information disclosure costs maybe as high as 1.44%. Cash drag could account for an additional .83% and taxes for non-qualified monies at may be near 1%. Registered investment adviser fees can also average around 1%.

Although investors can’t necessarily remedy or reverse these expenses, they can become more knowledgeable before purchasing a fund. One way is to call the fund owner and ask for the fund’s “Statement of Additional Information,” which is broader than a ubiquitous prospectus. Another resource is a forbes.com article titled, “The Real Cost of Owning a Mutual Fund,” which provides further detail on various expenses, and warns of yet an additional potential expense when a fund is bought through an investment adviser.

Alternative investment and tax management strategies can alleviate some of the tax burden that can come with owning funds. There also remains a possibility of paying taxes on gains within a fund that experiences a losing year overall. A retirement adviser can provide investment alternatives that produce tax-free income, but are not exclusive of fees, make no mistake. Similarly, an adviser or tax preparer – with sufficient notice that often begins in late summer or early fall – can identify assets offsetting gains and loses through end of the year tax harvesting.

Despite a full sea of financial mouse print, it behooves investors to seek information from sources besides funds’ representatives to gain a full grasp of mutual fund ownership expenses.

Syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews Investment Adviser Representative Rodger Sprouse on Retirement Expectations. Right on the Money is a weekly financial talk show for consumers, distributed as video press releases to 280 media outlets and social media networks nationwide.

Foundational Income is the Strength of Retirement- Rodger Sprouse

Building Your Retirement Foundation Upon the Footings of Guaranteed Income

Life’s ongoing expenses, regardless of age, require regular infusions of income. An understanding of how assets fall on the risk/reward continuum, and even the discovery of forgotten assets, can facilitate a low-stress retirement. Watch the interview with investment adviser representative Rodger Sprouse.

Just as a pyramid has three vertical sides, the base layer of retirement’s pyramid of investment has three primary components: Social Security, pensions and annuities. With the common bond of lifetime income and low-to-no risk, each can play a significant role in meeting standard monthly expenses such as housing, utilities and food. Additional income sources, largely accumulated over years of saving through discipline, can either pitch in to cover these expenses or be used for discretionary purposes.

Social Security payments are provided by the government monthly and are determined by lifetime earnings and other factors. Eligibility begins at age 62, although the greatest monthly payment occurs by waiting until age 70 for the initial distribution. Payments continue for the life of a surviving spouse, who is bound by the base payment received at inception.

Pensions are paid by past employers under various scenarios. Payouts are often determined by a mix of tenure and compensation. Distributions are treated as taxable income, and typically do not allow for cost of living adjustments. Retirees with multiple past employers are encouraged to actively update their contact information with these organizations and any fiduciary administrators to ensure uninterrupted communications and distributions.

Annuities are insurance products that exchange a lump-sum payment for a lifetime of monthly payments. In contrast to Social Security, which is automatic for qualifiers, annuity purchases are voluntary. A popular feature of annuities is their ability to lock in values during periods of economic decline.

While these income sources can cover basic living expenses, overcoming common assumptions can be a difference-maker. A sampling includes:

• Though past and current workers largely believe that all their assets are within their grasp, more than one trillion dollars sits in abandoned 401(k) accounts. Many of these accounts belong to retirees, who should re-trace their careers for any missing accounts or balances.

• Individuals under estimate their longevity, perhaps retirement’s biggest wild card. While most believe they’ll die sooner than later, the fact is that median ages are now in the mid-late 80s, and many retirees don’t structure their assets to last.

Retirement is more than a set-and-forget endeavor. While a few automatics exist, many retirees will need to actively manage retirement’s lesser-known aspects to get ahead of the curve and live their desired lifestyle.

Syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews Investment Adviser Representative Rodger Sprouse on Retirement Expectations. Right on the Money is a weekly financial talk show for consumers, distributed as video press releases to 280 media outlets and social media networks nationwide.

The 3 Keys to Vetting Your Retirement Plan Adviser – Rodger Sprouse

Investors are Best Served by Advisers who Value Client Suitability

The abundance of information targeting retirees is as often as much a source of confusion as it is a solution. Retirees can cut through the clutter by choosing to work with an accredited adviser in an increasingly do-it-yourself world. Watch the interview with investment adviser representative Rodger Sprouse.

Just as diamond buyers value cut, color and clarity, investors can focus on three C’s – Comprehensiveness, Compatibility and Consistency – when seeking a trusted retirement plan adviser. Investors might ask themselves these questions in the review process:

1. Is the adviser comprehensive in the services he offers?

Observers suggest that up to 70% of Baby Boomers are without a retirement plan. For the many who find that a scary proposition, an accredited retirement plan specialist can be an excellent solution. The specialist resolves similar situations every day and can clarify the confusion resulting from the ample information available from print, radio, TV and online sources. A retirement specialist should have full knowledge of the investment landscape and access to the resources of a stockbroker, investment adviser or insurance agent. The retirement plan specialist recognizes the benefits of working with any of the three and the biases inherent in their fee structures.

2. Can the adviser find compatibility between client spouses and suitable investments?

A retirement plan specialist will seek to find compatibility between two spouses by testing them independently for their risk tolerance. Through data and conversation, he’ll discover their goals for lifestyle and longevity. He’ll also source alternatives that meet needs that will change over time. Studies indicate that women – more than men – invest more compatibly with their risk tolerances. The retirement plan specialist will work to bridge any gaps or prevent unwanted risks.

3. Is there consistency between what the adviser recommends and what the products deliver?

Time is of the essence in retirement. There aren’t “do-overs” to a plan, and Baby Boomers, especially, don’t have the time to take another 2008-like hit to their nest egg. Accordingly, the specialist’s recommendations and results should deliver on objectives. If income is needed, there should be allocations that pay dividends and interest. If long lives are traditional in the family, expect to see an annuity that pays a lifetime benefit. If tax advantages are desired, there should be discussion of a Roth IRA or a defined tax management strategy.

Aspiring and active retirees can shortchange themselves without proper guidance. They can benefit from a retirement plan specialist who possesses comprehensive knowledge, seeks compatibility between clients and investments, and presents opportunities consistent with their goals.

Syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews Investment Adviser Representative Rodger Sprouse on Retirement Expectations. Right on the Money is a weekly financial talk show for consumers, distributed as video press releases to 280 media outlets and social media networks nationwide.

Retirement Planning Requires Deep Diversification – Rodger Sprouse

Vertical Portfolio Diversification Includes Taxes, Time, Liquidity and Risk.

A portfolio with a variety of holdings is not necessarily a diversified portfolio. Investors who only strive for a blend of assets may be missing out on the protection and opportunities provided by an asset mix that covers risk, changing times and market volatility. Watch the interview with investment adviser representative Rodger Sprouse.

Although the practice of “not putting all your eggs in one basket” is common, a truly diversified portfolio occurs less frequently in retirement. For a retirement plan to endure, it’s not enough to spread wealth among a few assets, or even variations within an asset type. In fact, it goes much deeper. Diversification is demonstrated not only by asset types, but how those assets will perform individually and collectively over time. Four dimensions where assets can be put to the test of diversification are type, taxes, liquidity and risk.

Horizontal diversification involves multiple choices within an asset type. Mutual funds, for example, can have small, medium and large-cap holdings. Alternately, a vertically diversified portfolio would have not only mutual funds, but real estate, bonds and ETFs. If mutual funds have a bad year in general, a portfolio that’s only horizontally diverse in funds may likely suffer. But by complementing mutual funds with other asset types, the portfolio will be vertically diverse and stands to not suffer accordingly.

Taxes are often the largest expense in retirement. Accordingly, it makes sense to diversify a portfolio with assets that are both tax-deferred and tax-free. Accumulating tax-deferred accounts like IRAs and 401(k)s means that taxes will come due at distribution, and not before. A sensible tax diversification play is to own assets like a Roth IRA or fixed index annuity, which can produce tax-advantaged income, while not impacting Social Security or running the risk of bumping income into the next highest tax bracket.

Diversifying assets by liquidity offers risks and rewards. High concentrations of assets in stocks or money market funds can carry either undue risk or limited growth, respectively, while keeping those assets easily accessible. Assets in a less liquid instrument like a fixed index annuity may provide peace of mind and the assurance that an account balance (on most indexed annuities) will not decline. Staging assets for liquidity in the short-term (to handle an unexpected emergency); mid-term (2-5 year requirements such as home improvements); or long-term (meeting healthcare expenses or producing guaranteed lifetime income) is a common method matching assets to anticipated needs.

Diversification is most commonly associated with risk, and a good retirement plan will have a blend of assets that reflect the investor’s tolerance for risk. Risk-averse retirees may have proportionately more assets in money market funds, or in “safe-money” instruments, even with poor returns. Risk-accepting investors will allocate more resources to growth opportunities knowing that market cycles occur. Risk tolerance is highly individualized, and portfolios should be suited to each account owners’ risk threshold.

In general, diversification allows for successes within a portfolio, even in the event of an overall down year, and can be achieved by a vertical mix of assets inclusive of time, tax, liquidity and risk considerations.

Syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews Investment Adviser Representative Rodger Sprouse on Retirement Expectations. Right on the Money is a weekly financial talk show for consumers, distributed as video press releases to 280 media outlets and social media networks nationwide.