Month: August 2016

Intentional Tax Planning Can Increase Retiree’s Bottom Line

End of the Years Tax Harvesting Can Impact Non Qualified Funds Timely attention paid to low-profile financial factors can benefit net spendable income. Fees and hidden expenses often go unchecked and sabotage mutual fund returns. But perhaps tax management needs the most attention in retirement. “A place for everything, and everything in its place,” is a proverb often attributed to Charles Goodrich, a New England reverend of the early-mid 19th century. Its application to savvy retirement planning includes not only the role of income, portfolio allocation and deductions, but how intentional tax management can similarly benefit spendable net income....

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Retirement Planning Today Creates Your Future Lifestyle Tomorrow

Gut-check Planning Assesses Assets and Mortality. Retirees often avoid or procrastinate planning for the long term, despite the peace of mind benefits it can bring. Ever-increasing longevity is actively accounted for by the government and actuaries, but is slowly acted upon by retirees confronting a Catch-22 scenario of dollars vs. duration. Retirement advisers often observe clients and prospects who willingly spend many hours planning a two-week vacation, but precious little time planning for their remaining financial lifetime. It’s an inverse commitment of sorts, the type that can provide short-term gain and result, long-term pain. The reluctance to plan, especially...

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Medicare is Retirement Planning’s Other Stepchild

Like taxes, Effective Medicare Management Can Benefit the Bottom Line Medicare’s complexities go well beyond “healthcare for seniors.” High-income earners may be a surprised by their initial Medicare premiums. Medicare is yet another dynamic aspect of retirement planning that is best tackled pro-actively. Just as many retirees shortchange the role of effective tax management in retirement, they similarly underestimate – and frequently misunderstand – the role and expenses of Medicare. Medicare became law in 1965 under President Lyndon B. Johnson as an equal opportunity healthcare program for seniors. Intended as an “everyone pays the same” program (except for those...

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Use Age as the Gauge for Retirement’s Safe-Money Allocation

Persistent low interest rates and demographics drive the demand Multiple factors are impacting safe-money retirement purchase preferences. Demand for an alternative investment is being driven by a burgeoning retiree population and answered by retirement planning specialists with a multi-point solution. Retirees accustomed to a lifetime of asset accumulation are finding growth opportunities few and far between in what may be the second longest stage of their lives. Efforts to grow and even preserve their portfolios have been met by persistent headwinds in recent years and don’t show signs of changing soon. Low interest rates have persisted for years, compromising...

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Use Age as the Gauge for Retirement’s Safe-Money Allocation

Applying common sense and risk tolerance can satisfy a retiree’s investment appetite. A mix of common sense and risk tolerance can solve an investor’s appetite and foil market volatility. Aging investors and retirees cannot absorb another stock market hit like 2008. Once highly subjective, the age at which retirees can reduce unnecessary risk can be found on a driver’s license, birth certificate or by taking an honest look in the mirror. Allocations can both solve investors’ needs for safety, and mitigate speculative losses. Age is an age-old obsession. Young people want to look older. Old people want to look...

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